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Inoculant Mixing Simplified

Inoculant Mixing Simplified

When it comes to inoculant application, product waste is a key challenge for many applicators. Historically, the short shelf-life of inoculants once the package is opened, meant applicators were wasting inventory due to spoilage of mixed and unused product. This led applicators to use smaller inoculant package sizes, or clean and drain mixing tanks daily – which added time and increased labor and costs.

The use of inoculants in soybeans continues to rise, so the need for effective and efficient application is crucial as the industry continues to evolve and produce more bushels with less land.

A new inoculant mixing system is helping seed treatment applicators reduce waste, and save time and money when it comes to applying soybean inoculants. FlexConnect™ is the first closed transfer system for multi-component soybean inoculants.

Using a mixing port, the new technology enables the applicator to handle and mix inoculants of any volume straight from the packaging, without transferring to a separate tank. This helps to maintain the sterility of the product ensuring growers are receiving the highest-quality inoculant on their seed and consistency in performance.

By having a better inoculated seed from the start, growers can ensure they’re receiving the many other benefits that inoculants provide.

To learn more, visit www.vlsci.com/flexconnect.

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